Tech Is Great in Speech Therapy, but Don’t Become Too Dependent on It

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about technology. We, as speech-language pathologists, we love technology. I mean, a lot of us are utilizing iPads in some of our daily therapeutic practice. A lot of us are utilizing computers, the Internet, and other things along those lines. And why do we do that? It’s all in an effort to better connect with today’s 21st century learners so that we can teach them what they need to know.

Today’s children are all about technology.

Our younger clients, they can’t imagine a world without mobile phones, tablets, etc. So, that’s why it’s so important for us, as practicing clinicians, to be aware of these technologies so that we can weave them into our speech-language therapy, whenever appropriate.

But here’s something to keep in mind . . .

Technology, it’s great, but technology has batteries. And we all know the thing about batteries; batteries run out of juice. Think about it – remember that one time you needed to use the GPS app on your phone? You pulled out your phone and you looked down at it and then all of a sudden it hit you . . . you only had 2% battery left!

On no!

Then you frantically typed in the address and started your drive and you were all like, “Oh. My. God. I’ve got to get to the destination before my phone dies.”  And then . . .  BAMM! The phone dies and you don’t even have the proper cord to charge your phone in your car.

What a drag.

All of these pieces of technology that are a part of our world, yes, they’re useful, but their battery lives are limited. The reason why I bring this whole battery conversation to the table is because I think we need to be much more mindful of the fact that the iPad that we’re using, it very well might run out of juice and what do we do then? On more than one occasion, I’ve been using my iPad with a student and I’m making a lot of great progress – we’re going through the given app, there’s a lot of great conversation that myself and the client are engaged in. But then I look down and the iPad died.

Total buzz kill!

Then, I find myself scrambling. Oh no! Plan B, what’s Plan B? I’m not going to lie to you, sometimes I didn’t have a Plan B. And, I’m willing to bet I’m not the only clinician out there that didn’t have a Plan B once the iPad died. The reason why I didn’t have a Plan B is because I put too much emphasis on the technology. I depended on it too much. I viewed the technology as something that won’t fail. But of course it does. It’s technology, it’s fragile. I mean, batteries run out of juice, right? Or sometimes we might accidentally drop whatever piece of technology we have on the floor and it might break and it won’t be able to turn on again. Those are prime examples of how technology can fail us.

So what should we do, then?

The answer to that question is simple, have a Plan B. When you’re planning your next amazing speech-language therapy session, be sure to have something in the mix that doesn’t have batteries. There are many, many, many things out there that don’t have batteries that sometimes we forget about. Because right now, in this technology driven age that we’re all a part of, we’re very fixated on the tech. And like I said, tech is great, but don’t forget about the other things. Like the pencils. Like the paper. Like the markers. Like the paint. Paint doesn’t have batteries. Markers don’t have batteries. Papers and pencils don’t have batteries. These are the tried and the true. They will forever be there. So, don’t turn your backs on these things. They love you very much and you should love them, too! Hehe!

A challenge for you.

I have a challenge for you – can you go one week within your speech-language therapy world without using some form of digital technology. Is it possible? Hmm. That’s a good question. I think the answer is yes. Or at least it should be something that we explore because we never want to become too dependent on technology.

But wait . . .

I’m not saying don’t use email during that week, because I think we have to use email. I mean, I’m constantly sending emails to different colleagues and sometimes I’m sending emails to parents, so that’s not what I’m speaking about when I bring up this non-tech challenge. What I’m really speaking about is the optional technology that you might use, face-to-face, with your client. Maybe it’s a computer? Or a laptop? Maybe it’s an iPad?

iPads are great.

Trust me, I love iPads but I want to remind you that iPads are not the end-all be-all. We need to not be so dependent on technology. We need to remember the other, very valid, non-digital speech therapy materials that exist in our world and we need to make sure that we utilize those as much as the other digital therapy materials that we are all so accustomed to using nowadays.

In closing . . .

As always, I love having these conversations with you. So, after you go a week without using technology, please feel free to reach out to me and let me know how it went. Was it hard? Was it easy? Was it easier than you expected it to be? These are great conversations for you and I to have because through our reflective discussions, we can grow and we can learn from one another. Cool? Cool!

Tech Is Great in Speech Therapy, but Don’t Become Too Dependent on It

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