Did You Know That Speech-Language Pathologists Are Also Chameleons?

Do you like getting compliments from people? Sure you do! So with that in mind, I’d like to take this moment to give you a compliment, right here and right now. Are you ready? My compliment to you is this – you are a chameleon.

A chameleon?! What?! Do you think I look like an iguana? How rude!

Sorry, sorry. Hold on. Let me back up. Ya see, when I tell you that you’re a chameleon, it’s actually not a bad thing. It’s a good thing. It’s a fantastic compliment!

Oh, it’s fantastic?! All right. Well, tell me more, then.

In my opinion, all speech-language pathologists are similar to chameleons and that’s a good thing because chameleons are a very unique animal. Ya see, chameleons, they have a spectacular ability to adapt. Think about it – their skin – it can blend in and match along with it’s surroundings. So if chameleons are standing next to, say, a bunch of grass, their skin color turns a shade of green because they’re able to acclimate to their surroundings. The same goes for chameleons that are standing next to desert sand. In that situation, presumably, their skin turns a sort of tan color. Why? Because they are able to adapt with no problems, at all. How cool is that?

Chameleons are the kings and queens of adaptability.

And SLPs, we are kings and queens of adaptability, too. In my honest opinion, adaptability and SLPs – the two really go hand in hand. We, as clinicians, are so fortunate to be a part of a field that allows us to work together with so many different people in so many different settings. And, the fact that you’re able to mentally do that so effortlessly, I believe that’s what separates you from so many other educators and healthcare professions. You have a unique gift that’s hard to come by. Your ability to adapt to so many different environments is something that should be celebrated.

Hooray for adaptability!

Here’s a scenario that you might have experienced within your work-place environment. First thing in the morning, you might be working with a child who has some articulation difficulties. Then, maybe the next hour you might be working with a child who has some expressive and/or receptive language difficulties. Then, maybe in yet another hour you might be working with a child who stutters. Can you see how often you have to “change your skin” to “match your new surroundings?” You’re adapting your clinical knowledge to sync up with what your given client is struggling with, all in an effort to help. And you’re able to do all of that in the blink of an eye. Wow. You’re magical! You make it look so easy! Go you!

Fantastic creatures, for sure!

So, that’s what I mean. When I called you a chameleon, it’s a good thing. Not a bad thing. Chameleons are fantastic creatures and SLPs, we’re also fantastic creatures.

In closing . . .

Do me a favor. Share this blog post with one of your colleagues that you admire. And let that person know that he or she is a chameleon. I believe that it’s a compliment worth giving and worth spreading because it reminds us just how good we are at what we do. So, hold that chameleon head up high. You rock!

Did You Know That Speech-Language Pathologists Are Also Chameleons?

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